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20130209
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
students, who have joined us to go on an exploration of religion. but what a journey it is. [ music ] [male voice:] so be it. [crowd:] so be it. [male voice:] tonight - [crowd:] tonight - [dr. simons:] this is armageddon, the field of armageddon. this is definitely not your father's oldsmobile. we're at the western wall, the last remaining wall of the second temple. we're at the san francisco zen center. it was the site of illinois greatest religious drama - the exodus of the mormons. this is the spot where jesus reputedly cried for jerusalem. [ music ] [male voice:] i'm not talking about god or buddha. [ music ] [female voice:] at the end of it, what is it for? for peace. [male voice:] you just discover it within our selves. [dr. simons:] we'll go through 24 classes in which we'll meet real believers from real religious settings and then we've added two new classes, the twenty fifth and the twenty sixth class back in the setting in which we'll discuss issues such as religion and violence, very much on people's minds. religion and science - new ways that science is helping us understand spi
's a tendency to say, "well, if you study all the religions, you water down your own religion." is there a way that a model or technique people might use, to cherish the integrity of their own views yet appreciate other worldviews or are we just barking up the wrong tree here? [prof. marty:] what's the big difference between appreciating and adopting? we once had a class in this campus where four people gave the views of the catholic mass. one took the role of freud, one of marx, one of marx's favorite, one of durkheim, four great students explaining that the mass is nothing but this, nothing but that. and after it was over a student in the class said that was very - you should have somebody there who believes in it. we said, "two of them do." a catholic can take on the role of being sigmund freud interpreting something in order to understand the phenomenon without yielding. i am a very reasonably intense member of the christian communion and for the last 35 - 40 years, i've been studying others. i believe i have real appreciation for them. i don't think i will go to the apostolic church of go
of religion, identity and relationship, and we'll be looking at that. i wanted to go to a roll-in, though, that we didn't get which is one of the more interesting ones we have at glide memorial methodist church out in san francisco. and this is, in a way, i think a little synchronicity here. maybe it's good we didn't get it in the last class because it's a good way to prompt some of the questions you might have about some of those key class themes we went over in our interview with cecil williams. now, this was quite a shoot. it's a fantastic church out in san francisco, and reverend williams said some amazing things about religion on this. but for the crew, what made the day, actually, it was my birthday - i went to church on my birthday when we did this shoot, and it was chaos. i mean, thousands of people around, nobody knew where we were supposed to go, we're sitting down with all our equipment like some rock stars on a battle of the bands, hanging around there, just waiting for stuff to happen. and all of a sudden, this movie star walks in - what's her name? anybody know her? tall? se
. "our laws, our literature, our religion, our arts "all have their roots in greece. "but for greece, we might still have been savages and idolaters." the human form and the human mind attained to a perfection in greece which has impressed its image on those faultless productions whose very fragments are the despair of modern art and which can never cease to delight mankind until the extinction of the race. in the 18th and 19th centuries, europeans surrounded themselves with the images of greece and rome. they created for themselves personal museums which displayed their wealth, taste, and learning and idealized the virtues of reason, liberty, and justice. in this way, they elevated-- and even masked-- their mundane relationships with land ownership and manufacture, trade and empire, and they exported these ideals and the visual language which expressed them all over the world-- to the americas, the indies, and beyond. it is appropriate, then, that these are the first pictures we see in a series on the tradition of western art. we could have started in the caves of lascaux or the temples
of god" in the catholic religion. it was a means of going inside of yourself to find the strength within to deal with the outside world. one of my mentors was bill kunseler. there was one scene he told me about when he was in birmingham where he was representing dr. martin luther king. and they had come from a demonstration or rally, and king had been told that there were men looking to kill him that night. and they drove up to a house, and bill and king were staying in the house together with a group of other people. bill told the story that people were petrified that night. i mean, they thought that the house was going to bbombed, and they darkened the house so there were no lights at all. and he was afraid for his life. and king must have sensed this fear in the room. and he walked over to a piano and started to play "this little light of mine," and the whole group just started to sing this song, and they sang songs all through the night. and bill said at the end of this time, it was like there was nothing to be afraid of. i mean, he himself, a non-religious person, was moved by this
of teotihuacan unified by religion ? again, household excavations provided answers. physical anthropologist rebecca storey. in all the compounds that have been excavated, there has always been a central courtyard. and in the middle of it, we generally find some kind of architectural feature. now, in this particular compound, it's a very elaborate and very beautiful one -- look at the detailing on the stone, and also look at the little ornaments on top of it. there are fragments that shows that it once was plastered and painted. so we have to remember that it would have been completely brighter and much more colorful, and really looked splendid. keach: these strange and splendid structures were altars. but who was being worshiped here ? in 1980, rebecca storey and dolph widmer excavated a residential compound in a neighborhood of the city now called tlajinga. the evidence showed people had lived in the compound for close to 500 years. underneath the central altar, archaeologists discovered several skeletons, buried decades apart. storey: when we excavated under the central courtyards of tlaj
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)